Lenovo introduces its ThinkReality A3 Augmented Reality Smart Glasses for enterprise

In Augmented Reality News 

January 11, 2021 – Lenovo has recently introduced its new enterprise-focused ThinkReality A3 lightweight smart glasses at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). Lenovo states that its ThinkReality A3 smart glasses help to transform work across many levels of the enterprise, from customized virtual monitors and 3D visualization to augmented reality (AR) assisted workflows and immersive training.

The ThinkReality A3 tethers to a PC or select Motorola smartphones* via a USB-C cable. The device fits the user like a pair of sunglasses and can be enhanced with industrial frame options for safer and more durable use, according to Lenovo. The AR smart glasses are also powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon XR1 Platform and feature stereoscopic 1080p displays that present the user with up to 5 virtual displays. An 8 megapixel RGB camera provides 1080p video for remote expert use cases while dual fish-eye cameras provide room-scale tracking.

“The A3 is a next generation augmented reality solution – light, powerful and versatile. The smart glasses are part of a comprehensive integrated digital solution from Lenovo that includes the advanced AR device, ThinkReality software, and Motorola mobile phones. Whether working in virtual spaces or supporting remote assistance, the ThinkReality A3 enhances workers’ abilities to do more wherever they are,” said Jon Pershke, Lenovo Vice President of Strategy and Emerging Business, Intelligent Device Group.

PC Edition

The ThinkReality A3 PC Edition tethers to a laptop or mobile workstation to enable users to position multiple, large virtual monitors in their field of view (FoV) and use Windows software tools and applications. Lenovo states that virtual monitors help to expand the value of PCs, creating more productivity, privacy, and immersive experiences for industries like finance, architecture and engineering, as well as for any remote and mobile worker where space and privacy are limited.

Industrial Edition

The ThinkReality A3 Industrial Edition tethers to select Motorola smartphones for hands-free, AR-supported tasks in complex work environments. The Industrial Edition is supported by the ThinkReality software platform, which enables commercial customers to build, deploy, and manage mixed reality applications and content on a global scale, according to Lenovo.

For use in scenarios from factory floors and laboratories to retail and hospitality spaces, applications on the ThinkReality platform power remote assistance, guided workflows, and 3D visualization, allowing businesses to increase worker productivity and safety while decreasing error rates in daily tasks.

ThinkReality Ecosystem of AR/VR Solutions

Lenovo’s ThinkReality A3 smart glasses add to the company’s list of XR devices that includes the A6 headset, which features a full-featured sensor array, expandable memory, 1080p resolution waveguide optics, and a removable battery for extended use of the head mounted display; and the The Lenovo Mirage VR S3 all-in-one headset, which is specifically designed for enterprise virtual reality (VR) as a soft-skill training solution. Furthermore, for more advanced, high-performance mixed reality (MR) and VR applications, Lenovo offers a portfolio of workstations certified to work with various Varjo XR/VR headsets and is a reseller of Varjo’s human-eye resolution solutions.

The Lenovo ThinkReality A3 smart glasses will be available in select markets worldwide starting mid-2021. For more information, please visit the ThinkReality A3 website. For more information on Lenovo, please click here.

Image / video credit: Lenovo / YouTube

* Compatible with Motorola smartphones using a Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 series processor or better, and DisplayPort capability.

About the author

Sam Sprigg

Sam is the Founder and Managing Editor of Auganix. With a background in research and report writing, he covers news articles on both the AR and VR industries. He also has an interest in human augmentation technology as a whole, and does not just limit his learning specifically to the visual experience side of things.