Norway’s VY Group enters partnership with Bublar subsidiary, Vobling AB, for Virtual Reality firefighting training

In Virtual Reality News

August 26, 2019 – Vobling AB, a subsidiary of gaming studio and enterprise solutions company Bublar Group, has initiated a new partnership with the international railway operator, VY, (formerly Norske Statsbaner, NSB) based in Norway. The VY Group is one of the largest transport groups in the Nordic countries.

Vobling has been assigned by VY to develop a Fire Fighting simulator in Virtual Reality (VR), aimed to be used as an educational tool for staff training. The simulator will be run with HTC Vive Pro Eye and, in a future road map, can come to apply a more platform agnostic approach where both stand-alone VR headsets, 2D screens, augmented reality and other mediums come into play, according to Bublar.

“We are really excited about this project and our new client relationship with VY. During the last couple of years we’ve developed state of the art virtual training and education applications targeting staff. The Fire Fighting simulator is a natural extension in line with our strategy and it’s very exciting that we are broadening our geographical footprint to Norway”, said Anders Ribbing, CEO of Vobling AB.

“The VR-technology gives as an extraordinary way to simulate different scenarios and train our personnel in a safe and scalable environment. The training system will use object tracking and replicate fire, smoke, oxygen- and temperature levels in a realistic fashion which gives a new and powerful tool in our safety training procedures. The end game for this application is about saving lives – what could be more important than that”, said Ole Johnny Haugen, Head of Development at Vy Competence Center.

Image credit: Bublar Group

About the author

Sam Sprigg

Sam is the Founder and Managing Editor of Auganix. With a background in research and report writing, he covers news articles on both the AR and VR industries. He also has an interest in human augmentation technology as a whole, and does not just limit his learning specifically to the visual experience side of things.