Taqtile partners with Booz Allen Hamilton on 5G-powered Augmented Reality deployment as part of DoD project

In Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality News

April 14, 2021 – Taqtile, a provider of enterprise software that leverages augmented reality (AR) for knowledge capture and sharing, has today announced that it is working together with management and information technology consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton, to demonstrate the capabilities of 5G and Taqtile’s ‘Manifest’ augmented reality (AR) platform.

The project, which is taking place at Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) in Washington state, US, is designed to test the security, scalability, and resilience of 5G networks and the advanced capabilities of augmented and virtual reality (VR).

The JBLM deployment is part of a USD $600 million investment by the Department of Defense (DoD) to test 5G at five US military sites. According to the DoD, the project represents “the largest full-scale 5G test for dual-use applications in the world.” Planned projects include implementing 5G-enabled AR/VR platforms for equipment maintenance and repairs, mission planning and training, and use in smart warehouses.

“The JBLM project is an innovative collaboration between 5G providers and AR category leaders like Taqtile,” stated Chris Christou, Vice President at Booz Allen Hamilton. “We expect this project to set a new standard for deploying advanced wireless applications on military installations.”

“We will break new ground through our work with Booz Allen Hamilton, demonstrating the advanced capabilities and tangible benefits of 5G and the Manifest AR platform on a military base,” said Dirck Schou, CEO of Taqtile. “The ability to use Manifest and 5G to put knowledge at the fingertips of frontline military personnel will make them exponentially more efficient and effective at their tasks.”

According to Taqtile, its Manifest platform can serve as a digital repository for maintenance and repair information, including video and audio notes, and related documents. Equipment-specific repair information can be seamlessly transferred between personnel, helping to reduce delays and the risk of human error. Manifest is also able to automatically upload all saved documents to a centralized maintenance queue for quick access to accurate materials.

Taqtile added that the project further deepens a strategic partnership between the company and Booz Allen Hamilton in terms of driving XR capabilities into DoD. “Booz Allen is committed to remaining on the edge, integrating and deploying advanced capabilities for the warfighter,” stated Eric Billies, Booz Allen’s Principal, guiding business in the Pacific Northwest that includes delivering immersive solutions for multiple defense clients. “That is why partnering with companies like Taqtile is so valuable – combining applications like Manifest with other technologies including 5G, AI/ML and cybersecurity helps our clients realize the power of XR for mission execution.”

Participation in the JBLM 5G initiative is the latest endeavour that Taqtile has been contracted to implement with the US military. The company was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 contract by the US Army last year, providing the opportunity for the Army to evaluate Taqtile’s Manifest AR platform in use by motor-pool personnel. Taqtile also stated that it recently supported a study with the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) measuring the impact of its AR platform on technician performance. According to the company, among the confirmed benefits was a 53% reduction in errors and discrepancies by technicians using the Manifest platform.

For more information on Taqtile and its augmented reality platform, please visit the company’s website.

Image credit: Taqtile / YouTube

About the author

Sam Sprigg

Sam is the Founder and Managing Editor of Auganix. With a background in research and report writing, he covers news articles on both the AR and VR industries. He also has an interest in human augmentation technology as a whole, and does not just limit his learning specifically to the visual experience side of things.