Oracle announces opening of new Industry Lab to provide testing ground for enterprise customers to explore immersive technologies

In Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality News

April 27, 2022 – Oracle, a multinational computer software company, has announced that it has opened the doors to its new 30,000-square-foot Oracle Industry Lab just outside of Chicago, Illinois, US. The working lab will provide enterprise customers with a hands-on environment to develop new ideas and create solutions leveraging technology from Oracle and more than 30 industry partners. Supported by Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband, the lab will first focus on the energy and water, construction and engineering, communications, and manufacturing industries.

One of the 30 industry partners participating at the lab is Taqtile, a provider of enterprise software that leverages augmented reality (AR), cloud computing, and LTE/5G networks for knowledge capture and sharing. Users of the lab will be able to experiment, learn, and innovate with transformative technologies including Taqtile’s augmented reality (AR) enabled work-instruction platform, Manifest.

With Manifest, frontline workers have instant access to their organization’s work-instruction content, which can range from digitized manuals, step-by-step videos, and detailed holograms, enabling them to complete complex tasks more efficiently, more accurately, and more safely. According to Taqtile, at the lab, visitors will be able to interact with these functions of Manifest, as well as the platform’s remote-assistance capabilities. For example, Manifest allows deskless workers requiring additional support to connect with experienced technicians and trainers anywhere, anytime. With real-time guidance via the Manifest AR environment, including see-what-I-see video, company experts are able to remotely facilitate problem solving.

“The Oracle Industry Lab provides an unparalleled opportunity to collaborate with enterprise customers and explore new use cases and implementation scenarios for Manifest,” explained Joe Clukey, VP of Sales and Strategic Partnerships at Taqtile. “Leveraging the power of the Manifest system with proven benefits of Oracle Database technology will deliver advanced functionality to our customers, such as the creation of work order systems that seamlessly sync between technicians in the field and headquarters.”

“Many industries are at a crossroads as they look to navigate increasing regulatory, environmental, and customer-driven demands,” said Burcin Kaplanoglu, Vice President at Oracle Industry Labs. “We built the Chicago lab to bring together leading innovators like Taqtile so we can jointly help customers shape bold ideas into powerful solutions that improve productivity, operational intelligence, and sustainability.”

Other industry partners at the Oracle Industry Lab who are offering extended reality (XR) solutions include:

  • EDX Technologies – a provider of automated software solutions for the conversion and distribution of any information into interactive and collaborative mixed reality (MR) content.
  • Reconstruct – a SaaS platform that takes in camera-based reality capture, produces 3D reality models, places the models on a timeline against project schedules, and automatically overlays 4D BIM (BIM+Schedule) models.
  • VREX – a virtual reality (VR) for construction collaboration tool that helps to make 3d-models accessible to everyone across teams, regardless of role, training, or professional experience.

Oracle added that later this year it will open a new sustainability and mobility-centered lab in Reading, England and a construction industry-focused lab in Sydney, Australia. To find out more about the newly opened Oracle Industry Lab, click here.

Image / video credit: Taqtile / Oracle / Twitter

About the author

Sam Sprigg

Sam is the Founder and Managing Editor of Auganix. With a background in research and report writing, he covers news articles on both the AR and VR industries. He also has an interest in human augmentation technology as a whole, and does not just limit his learning specifically to the visual experience side of things.