Vive addresses several issues users are experiencing with Cosmos VR headsets

In Virtual Reality News

October 9, 2019 – Vive has announced that it is working to address several issues that have been raised by customers and product reviewers since the launch of the Vive Cosmos. In a recent blog post, the company said that it will continue to work to ensure users are getting the best experience with Cosmos, by addressing the following areas:

Tracking
Vive Cosmos uses inside-out tracking, which requires data points in a play environment to deliver the most accurate tracking, as well as consistent lighting. Set up works best in a bright room without mirrors or reflectors. Plain walls with a lack of defining features could affect tracking.

Vive had received low-light reports from users who were getting a persistent “dark environment” message, which got in the way of the VR experience. The company has since adjusted the notification window for low-light scenarios and the update is already live.

Vive states that its engineering team continues to fine tune the performance of the headset for different kinds of play environments, and it will be continuing to refine the tracking and notifications in these scenarios. Furthermore, the company stated that it expects to release another software update soon.

Content
Some users have pointed out that not all of their favorite titles are compatible with the Cosmos VR headset yet. While the majority of Viveport and Viveport Infinity experiences are optimized for Cosmos, the company is working with developers across stores to update their titles with controls for Cosmos. So far, the company has seen the developer community submit bindings for many titles. However, there are also some titles that are incorrectly prevented from launching that should be compatible with Cosmos. Vive is testing a fix internally and the company expects to release this week.

Cosmos comes with content packaged in the box with six months of Viveport Infinity included (one year if pre-ordered). According to Vive, currently ~ 90% of Viveport’s top 100 titles are compatible with Cosmos, including Battlewake, Arizona Sunshine, and Ninja Legends.

Controller Batteries
Cosmos uses AA batteries in its controllers. Some reports from users suggested that controllers were only lasting for two hours before the batteries died. Vive disagrees however, and states that this figure “is incorrect, and unfortunately, widely circulated. We’ve seen a wide range of performance and expect four to eight hours depending on light, environments, type of content, and other variables. The quality of the battery itself may also impact longevity.” So, it probably goes without saying that users should not be using cheap batteries in their controllers.

Again, Vive stated that its engineering team will continually work to optimize for performance, adding: “We’ve tested NiMH rechargeable batteries and found them to perform well.”

Ergonomics and Build
For ergonomics, the company is pointing users who are having issues fitting their Cosmos headsets comfortably to their heads to the user guide, in order to illustrate the proper way to wear the headset. The fact that the company is addressing ergonomics this soon after release suggests that several users have found the Cosmos difficult to use comfortably. Vive reiterated the reasons behind using the Cosmos’ adjustable head strap and halo design, which are meant to balance weight distribution, and provide soft and lightweight materials to allow for all-day play.

Vive has also addressed audio issues with the headset’s built-in headphones, and asked users that are experiencing lower quality audio to check that they are using a USB 3.0 port.

Finally, the company finished by stating: “We are continuing to work to improve Cosmos and your experience and will update you with the most pertinent and timely information as it becomes available.”

For users who are still experiencing issues, they should contact Vive at www.vive.com/support/contactus.

About the author

Sam Sprigg

Sam is the Founder and Managing Editor of Auganix. With a background in research and report writing, he covers news articles on both the AR and VR industries. He also has an interest in human augmentation technology as a whole, and does not just limit his learning specifically to the visual experience side of things.